Archives For Free Stuff

 

Here’s a challenge… Pick 5 classics that are:

1) In the Public Domain and permanently FREE as Kindle ebooks

2) That you would read again and again

*** What Books would be on your list?

[ Our Writers on the Classics Series from last year... ]

Here are my 5 FREE Classic Ebooks:

FREE Classic Ebooks > > > >
Next Book

Poems by Emily Dickinson, Three Series, Complete

I’m much more likely to re-read poetry than I am fiction or non-fiction…

Continue Reading…

 

Practical Theology

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.

Check out the full library to date here….

This week we focus on works of practical theology from the early twentieth century. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

 

We are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books.

Continue Reading…

 

George MacDonald

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.
 
Check out the full library to date here….

This week we focus on the works of Scottish writer George MacDonald, whose work influenced C.S. Lewis and others. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

 

We are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books.

Continue Reading…

 

Leo Tolstoy

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.

Check out the full library to date here….

This week we focus on the works of Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

We are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books.

Continue Reading…

 

Early Modern Philosophy

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.

Check out the full library to date here….

This week we focus on Early Modern Philosophy. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

We are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books.


Continue Reading…

 

Here are 5 Free Ebooks for Kindle that are worth checking out:

These were taken from Amazon’s Kindle Bestsellers List.

For most of these, I have no idea when (or if) the book will cease to be free…

Free Ebooks > > > >
Next Book

The Twenty-Piece Shuffle: Why the Poor and Rich Need Each Other

By Greg Paul

Greg Paul believes that the rich, the impoverished, and everyone in between can learn much from each other if they’re willing to walk together. Join Greg as he takes a look at a remarkable paradox, where the poor can miss their blessedness while the wealthy overlook their own desperate needs, and reveals why God has always called the wealthy and powerful to care for people who are poor or excluded.

Contact us and let us know if this ebook is no longer free…

Continue Reading…

 

Medieval Christianity

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.

Check out the full library to date here….

This week we focus on Medieval Christianity. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

We are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books.


Continue Reading…

 

Here are 5 Free Ebooks for Kindle that are worth checking out:

These were taken from Amazon’s Kindle Bestsellers List.

For most of these, I have no idea when (or if) the book will cease to be free…

Free Ebooks > > > >
Next Book

The Bicycle Diaries: My 21,000-Mile Ride for the Climate

By David Kroodsma

“This is the kind of adventure we need more of–someone actually taking what they know and carrying it out to the people who need to hear it. Pedaling a bike, and peddling the truth about the most important issue of our time.” –Bill McKibben

Contact us and let us know if this ebook is no longer free…

Continue Reading…

 

Ancient Philosophy

This is the latest post in a series that will, in effect, create a library of classics that are available as free ebooks.

Check out the full library to date here….

This week we focus on Ancient Philosophy. We have selected the following books as recommended reading.

We are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books.


Continue Reading…

 

Julian of NorwichToday is the feast of Julian of Norwich.

Very little is known about Julian’s life. Her personal name is unknown; the name “Julian” simply derives from the fact that her anchoress’s cell was built onto the wall of the church of St Julian in Norwich. Her writings indicate that she was probably born around 1342 and died around 1416. She may have been from a privileged family that lived in Norwich, or nearby. Norwich was at the time the second largest city in England. Plague epidemics were rampant during the 14th century and, according to some scholars, Julian may have become an anchoress whilst still unmarried or, having lost her family in the Plague, as a widow. Becoming an anchoress may have served as a way to quarantine her from the rest of the population. There is scholarly debate as to whether Julian was a nun in a nearby convent or even a laywoman.

When she was 30 and living at home, Julian suffered from a severe illness. Whilst apparently on her deathbed, Julian had a series of intense visions of Jesus Christ, which ended by the time she recovered from her illness on 13 May 1373. Julian wrote about her visions immediately after they had happened (although the text may not have been finished for some years), in a version of the Revelations of Divine Love now known as the Short Text; this narrative of 25 chapters is about 11,000 words long. It is believed to be the earliest surviving book written in the English language by a woman. (via Wikipedia)

Quotes:
Continue Reading…