Rachel Held Evans

 

Church Matters:
An Interview with
Rachel Held Evans

 

I was excited to have the opportunity to talk recently with Rachel Held Evans about her excellent forthcoming book Searching for Sunday (which just received a starred review from Publishers Weekly).

[ Pre-order now: PaperbackKindle ]
 
ERB: One of the things that I really appreciated about your book was the deep love that was evident for the church. If I could oversimplify things a bit and summarize the book in only two words, I would describe it as “Church matters.”  In that vein, it seems like you are using your story to very gently and kindly push back on the “Spiritual, but not Religious” mentality. Is that a fair assessment of the book?

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History will see advertising as one of the real evil things of our time. It is stimulating people constantly to want things, want this, want that.
- Malcolm Muggeridge,

born on this date, 1903

 
The Wake Up Call
 
 
Poem of the Day:
The Changing Light,
by Lawrence Ferlinghetti
born on this date, 1919

 
 
 

Kindle Ebook Deal of the Day:
The Hardest Peace
by Kara Tippetts
ONLY $2.99!
(RIP, Kara Tippetts, who died on Sunday of breast cancer at age 38)
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The Wake Up Call – March 24, 2015

The Surprise of Living

A Feature Review of

Finding God in the Verbs: Crafting a Fresh Language of Prayer  
Jennie Isbell and J. Brent Bill

Paperback: IVP Books, 2015
Buy now: [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]

 
Reviewed By Trish Edwards-Konic
 
 
Do you want to dig deeper into your already flourishing prayer life? Or has your prayer life gotten boring? Do you long to have the prayer intimacy of the saints, or even the Psalmists? If you answered yes to any of these queries, this is the book for you.
 
Finding God in the Verbs: Crafting a Fresh Language of Prayer by Jennie Isbell and J. Brent Bill tackles these concerns and more. The 2 authors spent several years of conversation as they crafted this tome. Jennie Isbell is an experienced spiritual director and author of Leading Quakers. J. Brent Bill is a Friends minister and author of several books and articles such as Mind the Light: Learning to See With Spiritual Eyes and Imagination & Spirit.

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You may or may not know that we have recently launched a sister website that features the best deals on the best Kindle ebooks…
(No drowning in seas of self-published drivel or Christian fiction. No dubious theology. Only the best books, just as you expect here at The Englewood Review!)

Be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

Here are five of the very best deals that are currently running on the TCR website:

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Crocus

Today (March 20) is the first day of spring…
Here are a few of our favorite spring poems:

 

Another Spring

Christina Rossetti

If I might see another Spring
I’d not plant summer flowers and wait:
I’d have my crocuses at once,
My leafless pink mezereons,
My chill-veined snowdrops, choicer yet
My white or azure violet,
Leaf-nested primrose; anything
To blow at once not late.

If I might see another Spring
I’d listen to the daylight birds
That build their nests and pair and sing,
Nor wait for mateless nightingale;
I’d listen to the lusty herds,
The ewes with lambs as white as snow,
I’d find out music in the hail
And all the winds that blow.

If I might see another Spring–
O stinging comment on my past
That all my past results in “if”–
If I might see another Spring
I’d laugh to-day, to-day is brief;
I would not wait for anything:
I’d use to-day that cannot last,
Be glad to-day and sing.

NEXT POEM >>>>>

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Empowering Women
For Over 800 Years

 
A Feature Review of 

The Wisdom of the Beguines: The Forgotten Story of a Medieval Women’s Movement
Laura Swan

Hardback: Bluebridge, 2014
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Michelle Wilbert
 
 
In this well researched, accessible, and highly readable short history, Laura Swan, professor of religious studies at St. Martin’s University in Lacey, Washington, has opened the door to an exploration of a little known spiritual movement that flourished in the medieval period across Europe. Notable for its vigor, clarity of vision, and vocational integrity, it is made remarkable by the singular fact of gender: this was a woman’s movement that aspired to provide its members with real options at a time when virtually none existed. It gave women ownership of their spiritual development and expression, a considerable level of economic and social independence, and a passionately expressed sense of community and purpose.
 
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Book GiveawayOur Latest Book Giveaway…

 
We will pick five winners who will each get these two books:

The Divine Magician
Peter Rollins 
(Read our Review)


and

Flipped
Doug Pagitt  (Read our Review)

 
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LGFrancisStaying Awake

 

An Op-Ed on Ferguson and Faith

 

By Leah Gunning Francis,
author of Ferguson and Faith
(Forthcoming, Chalice Press,
Summer 2015)

 
In 1966, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered a speech titled Don’t Sleep Through the Revolution during a Unitarian Universalist General Assembly meeting in Hollywood, Florida.  King’s speech was a clarion call for the church to remain awake to the social injustices of the day, and join the efforts to eradicate oppressive systems in the United States and abroad.  It was one year after “Bloody Sunday” in Selma, Alabama where peaceful protests were lodged to lobby for African Americans to have the rights to vote, but were met with violent opposition from police and civilians. The images from “Bloody Sunday,” coupled with Dr. King’s invitation, compelled hundreds of clergy from around the country to come to Selma and join the struggle for voting rights.
 
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Bread for myself is a material question. Bread for my neighbor is a spiritual one.
- Nikolai Berdyaev, Russian theologian,
born on this date, 1874
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The Wake Up Call
 
Poem of the Day:
Dulce et Decorum Est
Wilfred Owen,
born on this date, 1893

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Kindle Ebook Deal of the Day:
Revangelical: Becoming the Good News People We’re Meant to Be
by Lance Ford
ONLY $1.99!!!
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The Wake Up Call – March 18, 2015

Redeemed Addicts

 

A review of

Vulnerable Faith: Missional Living in the Radical Way of Saint Patrick
Jamie Arpin-Ricci

Foreword by Jean Vanier.
Paperback: Paraclete Press, 2015

Pre-order now:  [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by D.L. Mayfield

 

*** Watch the trailer video for this book!

    We admitted we were powerless—that our lives had become unmanageable.
–Alcohol Anonymous, step one

 

       St. Patrick at first does not seem the poster child for addiction—what we commonly think of as wild and wicked behavior—at least, not how Jamie Arpin-Ricci introduces him.  In his new book Vulnerable Faith: following in the way of St. Patrick, Arpin-Ricci introduces a Patrick who looks a lot more like me and everyone I grew up with: young, privileged, self-assured and secure in the knowledge that life will work out well for him in the end. But the genius of this small book on intentional Christian living and discipleship is that it focuses so much on how it is precisely those of us who so often distance ourselves from the Other—the poor, the addict, the unspeakably lost—who are caught in the throes of powerlessness. We are the ones scrounging up reputations and possessions, desperate to outrun both our fear of death and the chaos that we know lurks within. And, just like those who follow the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous know, the first step in recovering is admitting that our lives have become unmanageable—especially spiritually.

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