The Question of Good News

A Feature Review of

Simply Good News: Why the Gospel is News and What Makes It Good
N.T. Wright

Hardback: HarperOne, 2015
Buy now: [ Amazon ] [ Kindle ]

Reviewed by Maria Drews

 

When it comes to the gospel, things have gotten confusing. I have heard the gospel of faith in Christ alone, where a belief that Jesus has died for our sins, sometimes sealed with a prayer, is rewarded with eternity in heaven. I have heard the gospel as a call for people to trust God’s present kingdom reign and an invitation to participate in it now. I hear the good news that God has conquered evil on a cosmic scale and all things are headed towards renewal. I also hear the good news of God’s love and the opportunity to have a relationship with God through Christ’s sacrifice. Mix in several theories of atonement, debates on hell, and an eschatology of awaiting a new heaven and a new earth (or the wildly opposite ending, everything burning up), and it can become difficult to put all the pieces together. Is one right? Are they all supposed to fit together? Isn’t the gospel supposed to be simple?

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You may or may not know that we have recently launched a sister website that features the best deals on the best Kindle ebooks…
(No drowning in seas of self-published drivel or Christian fiction. No dubious theology. Only the best books, just as you expect here at The Englewood Review!)

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* Help spread the word about TCR *
and enter to win a $40 Amazon Gift Card!

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Learning to Live with Others

A Review of

Two Recent Books by John Howard Yoder:

Revolutionary Christian Citizenship
Paperback: Herald Press, 2013.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

 

Real Christian Fellowship
Paperback: Herald Press, 2014
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Justin Bronson Barringer
 

A friend once told me he loved reading John Howard Yoder’s work because Yoder is a master of systematically building a careful argument, but often the complexity of his writing makes his work inaccessible to laypeople. I, for one, am convinced that even the best theology is worth little if it cannot find its way into the hearts and minds of God’s people.

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Preaching after Christendom
 
A Review of

Without Apology: Sermons for Christ’s Church
Stanley Hauerwas

Paperback: Seabury, 2013
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Joseph Krall

 
 
Submitting a late review of an untimely book, this reviewer offers his apologies to the readers of the Englewood Review. The untimeliness of Stanley Hauerwas’s latest collection of sermons, Without Apology (Seabury, NY: 2013), is of a different kind. It is an unapologetic untimeliness, neither ashamed of the Gospel nor trying to render its foolishness comprehensible or defensible in an era after Christendom. I would call it a holy untimeliness, because in these pages a Christian theologian and ethicist walks to the pulpit and speaks to a “peculiar people,” the church.

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George_Herbert

Today (Feb. 27) is the Feast Day of George Herbert in the Anglican Church…
Here are a few of our favorite poems of his:

 

Life

George Herbert

I made a posy, while the day ran by:
“Here will I smell my remnant out, and tie
                           My life within this band.”
But Time did beckon to the flowers, and they
By noon most cunningly did steal away,
                           And withered in my hand.

 

My hand was next to them, and then my heart;
I took, without more thinking, in good part
                           Time’s gentle admonition;
Who did so sweetly death’s sad taste convey,
Making my mind to smell my fatal day,
                           Yet, sug’ring the suspicion.

 

Farewell dear flowers, sweetly your time ye spent,
Fit, while ye lived, for smell or ornament,
                           And after death for cures.
I follow straight without complaints or grief,
Since, if my scent be good, I care not if
                           It be as short as yours.

NEXT POEM >>>>>

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Here are a few new book releases from this week that are worth checking out:

(Where possible, we have also tried to include a review/interview related to the book…)

See a book here that you’d like to review for us?
Contact us, and we’ll talk about the possibility of a review.

New Book Releases

The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You

By Jessica N. Turner

Watch the book trailer for this book

NEXT BOOK >>>>>

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Entering into Life.

A Feature Review of

The Allure of Gentleness: Defending the Faith in the Manner of Jesus
Dallas Willard

Hardback: HarperOne, 2015
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Elane O’Rourke

 
As Dallas Willard’s daughter, Rebecca Willard Heatley, write in the Preface to The Allure of Gentleness, “Gentle was a word frequently used to describe my father.” That gentleness permeates Dallas Willard’s latest posthumously published book. Allure is based on the transcription of a set of 1990 talks on apologetics in which Willard displayed his characteristic ease and thoughtfulness. Those who miss Willard’s presence and teaching will likely take pleasure in Allure’s prose: reading it is a nearly aural experience.

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TCR-Logo-400pxW

You may or may not know that we have recently launched a sister website that features the best deals on the best Kindle ebooks…
(No drowning in seas of self-published drivel or Christian fiction. No dubious theology. Only the best books, just as you expect here at The Englewood Review!)

Be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

* Help spread the word about TCR *
and enter to win a $40 Amazon Gift Card!

Here are five of the very best deals that are currently running on the TCR website:

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Light, Logos, Love.

A Review of

Tolkien’s Sacramental Vision: Discerning the Holy in Middle Earth
Craig Bernthal

Paperback: Second Spring, 2014.
Buy now: [ AmazonKindle ]

 

Reviewed by Alden Lee Bass

 
 
At an event in San Francisco in 2003, when literary critic Joseph Pearce explained to a gathering of Tolkien fans that the author’s Catholicism was an integral and crucial part of The Lord of the Rings, several members of the audience got up and left. Yet it’s not only casual readers who miss this obvious point – Tolkien scholarship is divided between those who emphasize the pagan elements of his great works and those who see an underlying Christian infrastructure. For those versed in Christian theology, the Christian elements of Tolkien’s epic are unmistakable: from Gandalf’s death and resurrection to Gollum’s failed redemption to Frodo and Sam’s march up Mount Doom to destroy the ring. Tolkien himself said in one of his letters, “The Lord of the Rings is of course a fundamentally religious and Catholic work; unconsciously so at first, but consciously in the revision.”

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John Henry Newman

Tomorrow (Feb. 21) is the birthday of Cardinal John Henry Newman…
Here are a few of our favorite poems of his:

 

The Sign of the Cross

John Henry Newman

WHENE’ER across this sinful flesh of mine
I draw the Holy Sign,
All good thoughts stir within me, and renew
Their slumbering strength divine;
Till there springs up a courage high and true
To suffer and to do.

And who shall say, but hateful spirits around,
For their brief hour unbound,
Shudder to see, and wail their overthrow?
While on far heathen ground
Some lonely Saint hails the fresh odor, though
Its source he cannot know.
 

NEXT POEM >>>>>

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